London riots

Consent of the governed


speed limit

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4 October, 2011

Speaking at the recent Conservative party conference, a government minister has said that the mass arrests and prison sentences for decent citizens who chose to rob shops and set buildings ablaze in London and other cities during a recent wave of looting, had brought the law into disrepute. "Our laws against arson were introduced centuries ago, when a typical London building was built of wood. There have been huge advances in fire-fighting technology since then. Our blanket ban on arson has been discredited, because it failed to keep up with these changes. And what about "vandalism"? Should the law really be fixated on the practices of wandering bands of hairy Germanic tribesmen? Can anyone genuinely say he thinks our laws against burglary are fit for a 21st century economy? By allowing a portion of the shops' overpriced merchandise go up in flames, and another portion to the informal vending sector, where it is substantially marked down, we bring thousands of decent firebugs and careless shoppers back within the law, restoring the legitimacy of the penal system, improving productivity and delivering hundreds of millions of pounds of stimulus that the economy sorely needs."

No, sorry, I got that wrong. The correct quote is:


The 70mph motorway speed limit has become "discredited" and resulted in millions of motorists breaking the law, Transport Secretary Philip Hammond said today as he confirmed plans to consult on allowing it to rise to 80mph.

Mr Hammond told the Conservative Party conference the move would "restore the legitimacy" of the system and benefit the economy by "hundreds of millions of pounds".

He said: "The limit that was introduced way back in 1965 - when the typical family car was a Ford Anglia."

Mr Hammond said he owned an Anglia, as did Baroness Thatcher when she became an MP, but added: "Things have changed quite a bit since then. There have been huge advances in car technology, road deaths have been reduced by three-quarters.

"Meanwhile, the 70mph limit has been discredited because it failed to keep up with these changes - with almost half of all motorists exceeding it, bringing the law into disrepute.

"So I will consult on increasing the limit on motorways to 80 mph, bringing millions of decent motorists back within the law, restoring the legitimacy of the speed limit system, speeding up journey times, improving productivity and delivering hundreds of millions ofpounds of net economic benefits."


We should start making a list. Laws that need to be ruthlessly enforced when they are disobeyed en masse: Arson, burglary, "theft by finding", receiving stolen goods. Laws that need to be abolished when they are disobeyed en masse: Tax laws, speed limits. Hmmm. What's the pattern? Prosperum ac felix scelus virtus vocatur. [Seneca. A successful and happy crime gets to be called virtue.]

Of course, Monty Python nailed it while I was still a toddler. In this case, the Mouse Sketch:


Make a thing illegal and it acquires a mystique. Look at arson - I mean, how many of us can honestly say that at one time or another he hasn't set fire to some great public building? I know I have. The only way to bring the crime figures down is to reduce the number of offences.








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